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Open Access Research

The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta +294T > C polymorphism and alcohol consumption on serum lipid levels

Xian-Liang Wei12, Rui-Xing Yin1*, Lin Miao1 and Dong-Feng Wu1

Author Affiliations

1 Department of Cardiology, Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, the First Affiliated Hospital, Guangxi Medical University, 22 Shuangyong Road, Nanning 530021, Guangxi, People's Republic of China

2 Department of Anatomy, School of Premedical Sciences, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning 530021, Guangxi, People's Republic of China

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Lipids in Health and Disease 2011, 10:242  doi:10.1186/1476-511X-10-242

Published: 23 December 2011

Abstract

Background

The single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARD) gene affects serum lipid profiles, but to what extent alcohol consumption interferes with this association remains unknown. The present study was undertaken to compare the association of PPARD +294T > C (rs2016520) polymorphism and serum lipid levels in the nondrinkers and drinkers.

Methods

A total of 685 unrelated nondrinkers and 497 drinkers aged 15-82 were randomly selected from our previous stratified randomized cluster samples. Genotyping of the PPARD +294T > C was performed by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism. Interactions of the PPARD +294T > C genotypes and alcohol consumption on serum lipid levels were detected by using a factorial regression analysis after controlling for potential confounders.

Results

The levels of triglyceride (TG), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), apolipoprotein (Apo) A1, and the ratio of ApoA1 to ApoB were higher in drinkers than in nondrinkers (P < 0.05-0.001). There were no significant differences in the levels of total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and ApoB between the two groups (P > 0.05 for all). The frequencies of TT, TC and CC genotypes were 56.0%, 36.4% and 7.6% in nondrinkers, and 57.2%, 38.0% and 4.8% in drinkers (P > 0.05); respectively. The frequencies of T and C alleles were 74.2% and 25.8% in nondrinkers, and 76.2% and 23.8% in drinkers (P > 0.05); respectively. There was also no significant difference in the genotypic and allelic frequencies between males and females in both groups (P > 0.05 for all). The levels of TC in nondrinkers were different among the three genotypes (P = 0.01), the C allele carriers had higher serum TC levels than the C allele noncarriers. The levels of all seven lipid traits in drinkers were not different among the three genotypes (P > 0.05 for all). The interactions of PPARD +294T > C genotypes and alcohol consumption on serum lipid levels were not detected in the drinkers (P > 0.05 for all). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that serum TC, HDL-C, LDL-C, ApoA1, and ApoB levels were correlated with genotypes in drinkers but not in nondrinkers (P < 0.05-0.01).

Conclusions

These results suggest that the great majority of our study populations are beneficial from alcohol consumption. But there is no interaction between the PPARD +294T > C genotypes and alcohol consumption on serum lipid levels in the drinkers.